Poor sleep may point to onset of Alzheimer’s disease: study

Poor, disrupted sleep may indicate the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in people who are otherwise healthy, a study warns. Researchers from University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US found that people who reported worse sleep quality, more sleep problems and daytime sleepiness had more biological markers for Alzheimer’s disease in their spinal fluid than people who did not have sleep problems. Those biological markers included signs of the proteins amyloid and tau and brain cell damage and inflammation. “It’s important to identify modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s given that estimates suggest that…

Read More

Childhood obesity may lead to hip disease, suggests research

Obesity may put children at increased risk of hip disease, a condition that can cause life-long morbidity, suggests new research. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood. “Ultimately this study helps us to better understand one of the main diseases affecting the hip in childhood,” said one of the study authors Daniel Perry from the Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, in…

Read More

How diabetes fosters gum disease?

Diabetes causes a shift in the oral microbiome which may lead to an increased risk of developing periodontitis, also known as gum disease, which causes inflammation around the teeth as well as bone loss, researchers say. The study, conducted in mice, revealed that when diabetic mice developed high blood sugar levels or were hyperglycemic, their microbiome became distinct from their normal littermates, with a less diverse community of bacteria. These diabetic mice also had periodontitis, including a loss of bone supporting the teeth, and increased levels of IL-17 — a…

Read More

Childhood obesity increases risk of hip disease in adolescence

A new study has found that childhood obesity can increase risk of hip diseases in adolescence. Significant hip deformities affect around 1 in 500 children and Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease in adolescents. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood. Senior author Daniel Perry and his team examined individuals under 16 with a diagnosis of SCFE between 1990 and 2013. Children with a SCFE experience a decrease in their range…

Read More