Poor sleep may point to onset of Alzheimer’s disease: study

Poor, disrupted sleep may indicate the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in people who are otherwise healthy, a study warns. Researchers from University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US found that people who reported worse sleep quality, more sleep problems and daytime sleepiness had more biological markers for Alzheimer’s disease in their spinal fluid than people who did not have sleep problems. Those biological markers included signs of the proteins amyloid and tau and brain cell damage and inflammation. “It’s important to identify modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s given that estimates suggest that…

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Marijuana may up psychosis risk in teenagers: Study

Daily consumption of marijuana may increase an adolescent’s risk of having recurrent psychotic-like experiences by 159 per cent, according to a new study. The psychotic-like experiences include the experiences of perceptual aberration — for example feeling that something external is part of their body — and thinking that they have been unjustly badly treated. “Our findings confirm that becoming a more regular marijuana user during adolescence is, indeed, associated with a risk of psychotic symptoms,” said lead author Josiane Bourque, doctoral student at the Universite de Montreal (UdeM) in Canada.…

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Meningitis shot also offers some defence against gonorrhoea: Study

Researchers studying a mass vaccination campaign against meningitis have found a surprising side effect – the shots also offered moderate protection against gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection that is causing global alarm. The findings, published in The Lancet medical journal on Tuesday, mark the first time an immunisation has shown any protection against gonorrhoea and point to new avenues in the search for a gonorrhoea vaccine, scientists said. “This new research could be game-changing,” said Linda Glennie, an expert at the Meningitis Research Foundation who was not directly involved in…

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X-rays, even in low dose, may harm your heart : Study

Even low exposure to ionising radiation, such as X-rays, may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, a study has cautioned. The findings indicated that an individuals’ exposure to X-rays, even at around 0.5 Gy — which is equivalent to recurrent CT scan imaging — is associated with a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular damage, up to decades after exposure. Further, exposure to X-rays also caused several other permanent alterations in the human coronary artery endothelial cells that had the potential to adversely affect their essential functions. Endothelial cells, which form…

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What’s in your sandwich? Subway disputes study on chicken

How much chicken is actually in your chicken sandwich? A study by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s consumer affairs show “Marketplace” says researchers conducted DNA tests on several chicken sandwiches from fast-food restaurants and found that Subway’s chicken breast contained only about half chicken. The rest was mostly soy. Subway said the report was absolutely false and misleading and that its chicken is 100 per cent white meat with seasonings, marinated and delivered to stores as a finished, cooked product. The study said DNA researcher Matt Harnden at Trent University’s Wildlife…

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Eating walnuts may help control appetite: Study

Individuals who regularly consume walnuts, salmon and canola oil — rich in polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) — are likely to experience hormonal changes that can control appetite and make them feel less hungry, a study has shown. The study found that consuming a diet high in PUFAs caused a significant decrease in fasting ghrelin — a hormone that increases hunger. Further, a PUFA rich diet also caused significant increase in peptide YY (PYY) — a hormone that increases fullness or satiety. “Appetite hormones play an important role in regulating how much…

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8 helpful tips for getting a study scholarship

Winning a scholarship isn’t as hard as you might think, there are certain tips that can help you maximize the process and achieve your goal of winning a study scholarship. Jumia Travel, the leading online travel agency, shares 8 helpful tips for getting a study scholarship. Start Your Search As Soon As Possible When trying to get a study scholarship, you need to start your search as soon as possible because if you wait till the last minute you will miss half the deadlines. There are many scholarship schemes out…

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Eating tomatoes every day may reduce risk of skin cancer, finds study

If you love eating tomatoes, then here’s another reason to keep up the good habit. A recent study has found that eating tomatoes daily brings down the risk of skin cancer, especially in men, by half. Through a study conducted on mice, researchers explained how nutritional interventions can alter the risk for skin cancers. Male mice were fed a diet consisting of 10% tomato powder daily for 35 weeks, then exposed to ultraviolet light. They experienced, on average, a 50% decrease in skin cancer tumours compared to mice that ate…

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Study Shows This Diet Change Could Help You Lose Twice As Much Weight As Cutting Calories

Going “vegetarian” has been a hot topic for years now, and experts continue to debate whether it is better for your skin, weight and overall health, among other things. Many vegetarians (at least most of the ones I know) love having a plethora of reasons to convince omnivores to give up meat and move into their world of eco-friendly eating. And thanks to the results of a new study, here’s yet another one veggie-only lovers can use to back up their case. Scientists from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine…

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Eating oranges, grapefruit daily can reduce risk of dementia among the elderly: Study

Older adults who consume orange and grapefruit every day can lower the risk of dementia by 23%, finds a study. Researchers from Tohuku University in Japan have found that daily intake of any citrus fruits such as oranges, grapefruits, lemons or limes can cut the chances of developing the incurable brain condition by almost a quarter. The findings suggested that the citric acid contains a chemical nobiletin, which in animal tests has shown to slow or reverse impairment of memory. The team analysed more than 13,000 older adults for up…

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