Childhood obesity may lead to hip disease, suggests research

Obesity may put children at increased risk of hip disease, a condition that can cause life-long morbidity, suggests new research. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood.

“Ultimately this study helps us to better understand one of the main diseases affecting the hip in childhood,” said one of the study authors Daniel Perry from the Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, in Britain.

Children with SCFE experience a decrease in their range of motion, and are often unable to complete hip flexion or fully rotate the hip inward. Early recognition of SCFE is important as the deformity may worsen if the slip remains untreated.

In an effort to identify children at higher risk of this condition, the researchers examined hospital and community based records to explore factors associated with SCFE, and explanations for diagnostic delays.

All of the records examined were of individuals under 16-years-of-age with a diagnosis of SCFE and whose electronic medical record was held by one of 650 primary care practices in Britain between 1990 and 2013.

Using the height and weight of children recorded in the notes at some point before the disease was diagnosed, the researchers were able to identify that obese children appear at highest risk of this condition, according to the study published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood.

“This is the best evidence available linking this disease to childhood obesity — which makes this condition to be one of the only obesity-related disease that can cause life-long morbidity starting in childhood,” Perry said.

Childhood obesity increases risk of hip disease in adolescence

A new study has found that childhood obesity can increase risk of hip diseases in adolescence. Significant hip deformities affect around 1 in 500 children and Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease in adolescents.

The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood. Senior author Daniel Perry and his team examined individuals under 16 with a diagnosis of SCFE between 1990 and 2013.

Children with a SCFE experience a decrease in their range of motion and are often unable to complete hip flexion or fully rotate the hip inward. (Shutterstock)

Using the height and weight of children recorded in the notes at some point before the disease was diagnosed, the researchers were able to identify that obese children appear at highest risk of this condition.

Children with a SCFE experience a decrease in their range of motion and are often unable to complete hip flexion or fully rotate the hip inward.Unfortunately, many cases of SCFE are misdiagnosed or overlooked, because the first symptom is knee pain, referred from the hip. The knee is often investigated and found to be normal.

Early recognition of SCFE is important as the deformity may worsen if the slip remains untreated.

Daniel Perry, from Alder Hey Children’s Hospital in UK, said, “This is the best evidence available linking this disease to childhood obesity, which makes this condition to be one of the only obesity-related disease that can cause life-long morbidity starting in childhood.”

“A significant proportion of patients with SCFE are initially misdiagnosed and those presenting with knee pain are particularly at risk,” Perry added. The study is published in journal of Archives of Disease in Childhood journal.

Our weekly wrap of key findings about obesity that you should know

Obesity numbers have more than doubled in 73 countries and surged elsewhere around the world. In an earlier report by the New England Journal of Medicine, in 2015, excess weight affected close to 30% of the world’s population. That included a lmost 108 million children and more than 600 million adults with a body mass index (BMI) above 30.

From an increased risk of stroke and various types cancer, to post-surgery infection and fatty livers, here are five scary facts about obesity that you need to know about.

1) Teenage obesity: Obese teenage boys are more likely to be at risk of getting a stroke as an adult. One of the factors that leads to it is the drop in the number of calories burned during adolescence due to a lack of exercise. A new finding reveals that men with excessive BMI increase from childhood to age 20 had a higher risk of stroke than those with average BMI increase.

2) Risk of cancer: A study recently concluded that obesity may lead to 13 types of cancer, including that of pancreas and oesophagus, as fat cells affect the processes that regulate the growth of cancer cells in the human body. Due to excess fat in the body, fat cells produce hormones and proteins, that are released into the bloodstream, and then circulated around the body.

 

3) Obesity and pregnancy: The relationship between the two is like a vicious cycle. Obese pregnant women are most likely to pass on a health threat to their unborn child. For instance, a study recently linked obesity during pregnancy to a fatty liver. According to the results, children born to obese mothers had an increased risk of suffering from a fatty liver during their teenage and well into adulthood.

 

Obesity may lead to 13 types of cancer.

4) The risk of infection: Obesity may cause a higher risk of infection, especially after bypass surgeries. A study established associations between body mass index the various outcomes following coronary artery bypass grafting and coronary angioplasty. Compared to patients with normal BMI, patients with BMI greater than 30 were 1.9 times more likely to suffer infections.

 

5) The cure: Despite the potentially fatal effects of obesity, beating obesity is often possible. From infants to the elderly, a regularised exercise routine, a healthy diet, and a stress-free sleeping pattern is all it takes to keep the disease at bay. For instance, a study published it’s reports, claiming that a proper eating and sleeping schedule can negate the risk of obesity in infancy, thereby ensuring a healthy and health conscious lifetime ahead.

Obesity May Put Women at the Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis

Obesity has become a global health concern with more than 2.8 million people dying each year as a result of being obese or overweight, as per the World Health Organisation. Anything in excess causes complications and so is the case with your weight. Obesity or the abnormal and excessive fat accumulation can impair your health in many ways. It has been linked to diabetes, heart trouble, high blood pressure

 Obesity May Put Women at the Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis

and even strokes. A new study, conducted by researchers from the University Hospital in Denmark, shows that obesity may also hamper your bone health and can increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis in women.

For the study, the team examined 54,284 participants (52% female) aged between 50 and 64 years. The collected information about the participant’s body fat composition and lifestyle factors at the beginning of the study. It was noted that 283 women and 110 men developed rheumatoid arthritis during a median follow-up period of 21 years.They took into account various risk factors such as age, smoking status, alcohol consumption and the level of physical activity and found obesity was linked to an increased risk of RA, but only in women.

arthritis

The risk of rheumatoid arthritis may be higher for obese women than men. 

Researchers suggest that rheumatoid arthritis should be included in the list of medical conditions linked to obesity and they also advice women who have a family history of the ailment to manage their weight carefully to avoid the risk. Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disorder that affects the joints such as that of the feet, hands and knees. There is no cure for the ailment but symptoms like pain and inflammation can be eased with the help of medication and physical therapy.

A lot of previous studies have shown that excess fat aggravates inflammation, thus making the condition worse. It also adds extra stress to the joints, especially the weight-bearing ones like that of the knees. This new study, however, points out that the risk of rheumatoid arthritis may be higher for obese women than men.