Poor sleep may point to onset of Alzheimer’s disease: study

Poor, disrupted sleep may indicate the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in people who are otherwise healthy, a study warns. Researchers from University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US found that people who reported worse sleep quality, more sleep problems and daytime sleepiness had more biological markers for Alzheimer’s disease in their spinal fluid than people who did not have sleep problems. Those biological markers included signs of the proteins amyloid and tau and brain cell damage and inflammation. “It’s important to identify modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s given that estimates suggest that…

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Marijuana may up psychosis risk in teenagers: Study

Daily consumption of marijuana may increase an adolescent’s risk of having recurrent psychotic-like experiences by 159 per cent, according to a new study. The psychotic-like experiences include the experiences of perceptual aberration — for example feeling that something external is part of their body — and thinking that they have been unjustly badly treated. “Our findings confirm that becoming a more regular marijuana user during adolescence is, indeed, associated with a risk of psychotic symptoms,” said lead author Josiane Bourque, doctoral student at the Universite de Montreal (UdeM) in Canada.…

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Childhood obesity may lead to hip disease, suggests research

Obesity may put children at increased risk of hip disease, a condition that can cause life-long morbidity, suggests new research. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood. “Ultimately this study helps us to better understand one of the main diseases affecting the hip in childhood,” said one of the study authors Daniel Perry from the Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, in…

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Anti-gravity treadmill may boost confidence post knee surgery

Using space age technology, a British scientist has developed an anti-gravity treadmill that can help people reduce their fears of re-injury as well as boost their confidence after knee operations. “The anti-gravity treadmill could provide a great environment for healing and help restore the belief that injured people could make a successful return to any sport they love,” said Karen Hambly, senior lecturer at the University of Kent and an international expert on knee rehabilitation. When people run, the load on their knee joints could be up to five times…

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New biomarkers may help detect brain injury faster

Researchers have identified inflammatory biomarkers which can be used to develop a test that can help detect whether the brain has suffered injury in the first hour of accident. The test can be used on the side of a sports pitch or by paramedics to detect traumatic brain injury — which leads to very early alterations in inflammatory proteins — at the scene of an accident, as well as improve clinical interventions, the researchers said. “Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of death and disability among young adults and,…

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Restless legs syndrome may cut sleep quality in pregnancy: Research

Pregnant women with restless legs syndrome (RLS) are more likely to have poor sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness and poor daytime function, researchers say. RLS is a condition characterised by a nearly irresistible urge to move the legs, typically in the evenings. The results showed that 36 per cent of women in their third trimester experienced RLS, and half of the women with RLS had moderate to severe symptoms, at least four times per week. “While we expected that RLS would be relatively common in pregnant women, we were surprised…

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X-rays, even in low dose, may harm your heart : Study

Even low exposure to ionising radiation, such as X-rays, may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, a study has cautioned. The findings indicated that an individuals’ exposure to X-rays, even at around 0.5 Gy — which is equivalent to recurrent CT scan imaging — is associated with a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular damage, up to decades after exposure. Further, exposure to X-rays also caused several other permanent alterations in the human coronary artery endothelial cells that had the potential to adversely affect their essential functions. Endothelial cells, which form…

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Yoga may protect against memory decline in old age : Research

Doing yoga for a long time could change the structure of your brain and protect it against cognitive decline in old age, suggests new research. When the researchers imaged elderly female yoga practitioners’ brains, they found that the “yoginis” have greater cortical thickness in the left prefrontal cortex, in brain areas associated with cognitive functions like attention and memory. As we age, the structure and functionality of our brains change and this often leads to cognitive decline, including impaired attention or memory. One such change in the brain involves the…

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‘Ovarian tissue freezing’ may provide hope for fertility treatment : Research

Ovarian tissue freezing can be an alternative method to promote fertility, especially in women who cannot undergo egg freezing due to cancer or other medical reasons, researchers say. The procedure which is still considered experimental involves removal and freezing of ovarian tissue for later use. The study, published in the journal Reproductive Sciences, showed that ovarian tissue freezing helped nearly four out of 10 (37.7 per cent) women to have children later in life. Between 1999 and 2016, a total of 309 ovarian tissue freezing procedures resulted in 84 births…

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Eating walnuts may help control appetite: Study

Individuals who regularly consume walnuts, salmon and canola oil — rich in polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) — are likely to experience hormonal changes that can control appetite and make them feel less hungry, a study has shown. The study found that consuming a diet high in PUFAs caused a significant decrease in fasting ghrelin — a hormone that increases hunger. Further, a PUFA rich diet also caused significant increase in peptide YY (PYY) — a hormone that increases fullness or satiety. “Appetite hormones play an important role in regulating how much…

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