Matcha a healthy choice: Drink this Japanese tea as it improves mood, memory and concentration

With Indian consumers getting more aware and conscious of healthy eating, consumption of green tea, gluten-free products or super foods has seen a rise. Matcha, a green tea from Japan, is an ingredient being innovatively used in ice creams, cupcakes and doughnuts.

For the uninitiated, Matcha is a finely ground green tea. In ancient Japan, monks primarily consumed it as a beverage of choice. Now it can either be dissolved in milk or water to add to its versatility — and also for its health benefits.

“Apart from health benefits like improving moods, memory and concentration, helping you relax, aiding in weight loss, matcha has taken a diverse transformation into the culinary world with people being more conscious about what they eat,” Chef Himanshu Taneja, Director of Culinary at The St. Regis Mumbai, told IANS.

“Adding matcha in food from a simple Frappuccino and turning it into a green tea Frappuccino, to adding matcha in our desserts like matcha cheesecake or a matcha ice cream, the ingredient is versatile and helps add to the health quotient,” he added.

Experts say eating healthy and staying fit has become an area of focus for people across all age groups, and they are increasingly looking at a variety of options that contribute to that lifestyle.

Given that Matcha is high in antioxidants, enhances calmness, boosts memory and concentration, increases energy levels and endurance, helps to burn calories and detoxifies the human body, improve cholesterol levels and more, it is fast making its way as an ingredient of significance.

matcha, matcha tea, matcha food products, matcha health benefits, why drinking matcha is good, matcha cosmetic products, Indian Express, health News

Chef Rahis Khan of Delhi’s Metropolitan Hotel and Spa says matcha nowadays is used to add flavour to a variety of Western-style confectionery items including chocolates, cakes, candies, cookies and green tea ice creams as it is the only tea in which the entire tea leaf is dissolved in water to provide the maximum benefits of its components.

“We, at (the hotel’s) Sakura (restaurant) serve matcha ice cream. Also, matcha-based drinks have been introduced such as smoothies, lattes, milkshakes and also alcoholic beverages,” Khan told IANS.

Foodhall, a premium lifestyle food destination by the Future Group, is also experimenting a lot with matcha. It has started a matcha experience zone that has flavoured macarons, iced tea latte, cupcake, cookies, baklavas, eclairs and doughnuts.

“I think with more places experimenting with matcha as an ingredient, people have become more open to adding it and experimenting with such dishes,” Olivier Vincenot, Corporate Chef at Foodhall, told IANS.

The combination of flavour and nutrition that it provides is interesting, says Smritika Sharma, Marketing Head at beverage brand RAW Pressery.

“Matcha is stronger as compared to other green teas, even when compared on caffeine levels. One must lower quantities right before bed time. Packed with catechins, matcha is an ideal pre-workout beverage. It boosts thermogenesis by 8 to 10 percent and hence improves fat burn.

“Matcha in cosmetics or through homemade masks is great for the skin. The chlorophyll present in the leaves acts as a powerful detoxifier which stimulates skin cells. Matcha, when applied topically, is also known to reduce sebum production and therefore is great for acne,” Sharma told IANS.

Love pasta? Here’s why you should eat it more often

People who regularly eat pasta — the fundamental component of Italian Mediterranean cuisine — may have better diet quality, greater intake of vitamin and minerals and can better manage blood sugar levels, compared to those who do not eat pasta, new research shows.

Pasta is a low-sodium and cholesterol-free food with a low glycemic index — foods that keep blood sugar levels in control.

pasta-main

“The study shows that pasta eaters have better quality diets than those who don’t eat pasta,” said Diane Welland, dietitian and Nutrition Communications Manager for the National Pasta Association — a US based organisation.

The findings showed that pasta eaters had a greater intake of nutrients and minerals that most people lack in their diets such as folate — that helps the body form red blood cells and reduces the risk of defects during foetal growth —; iron — used to carry oxygen in the blood and aids in reducing anemia — ;magnesium — a mineral used in building bones and releasing energy from muscles — and dietary fiber — which helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and lower risk of heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

In addition, eating pasta also led to less intake of saturated fat — which can help lower the level of cholesterol in your blood to decrease the risk of heart disease and stroke — and less added sugar — like sucrose and high fructose corn syrup that contain a whole bunch of calories with no essential nutrients.

“Pasta can be an effective building block for good nutrition, as it serves as a perfect delivery system for fruits, vegetables, lean meats, fish and legumes,” Welland added.

For the study, presented at The Obesity Society’s annual meeting in New Orleans, the team conducted a survey to examine the associations between pasta consumption, shortfall nutrient intakes as defined by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines (2015 DG) and diet quality in comparison to non-pasta consumption in the US adults.

Pineapple topping on pizza? This President hates it so much, he wants to ban it

Over the years, food connoisseurs and, of course, the Reddit community have generated endless ‘pineapple-on-a-pizza’ debates. Believe it or not, there are online forums that hotly debate “pineapple on pizza?” followed by discussions between purists and adventurists. The most recent one being the heated pineapple-pizza debate of 2017 with the hashtag #pineappleonPizza trending on Twitter.

Looks like the series of confrontations are going to continue now with President of Iceland Guðni Th Jóhannesson adding fuel to the fire. During a recent Q&A session at a high school in Akureyi, North Iceland, Jóhannesson threw a gastro-political grenade saying he hates pineapple on pizza so much that he would ban it if he could pass laws on his own. This was in response to a question by a student who asked what the president thought of pineapple as a pizza topping.

The pineapple-pizza debate is hardly new. The internet has been going crazy over it since some time now. (Source: Thinkstock Images)

President of Iceland Guðni Th Jóhannesson. (Source: Facebook/Forseti Islands)

His statement caught the attention of Twitteratis and as expected, soon it snowballed into a huge controversy. Jóhannesson had to issue a statement on his Facebook page in response to what he calls the ‘pizza controversy’.

He said, “I like pineapples, just not on pizza. I do not have the power to make laws which forbid people to put pineapples on their pizza. I am glad that I do not hold such power. Presidents should not have unlimited power. I would not want to hold this position if I could pass laws forbidding that which I don´t like. I would not want to live in such a country. For pizzas, I recommend seafood.”

It’s kind of funny, especially with social media fuming over his suggestion but there are a handful of people who support him, calling him ‘the leader we need’.

Food that tastes so nice, you say it twice: Burma Burma

Myanmar, or erstwhile Burma, is a country shaped by many influences and Burmese food as opposed to its common perception of it being an ineligible straggler in the hierarchy of Asian cuisines is actually a beautiful medley of cultural mix. Influenced by rich flavours from countries such as India, China and Thailand, Burmese cuisine has its own unique qualities – it is richer than authentic Chinese food but less spicy than Indian and Thai cuisines.

Considering a country that was isolated for almost 50 years owing to a repressive military dictatorship, the tide is slowly turning in the golden land in terms of food culture and has even crossed borders. Now, more and more people are experimenting with the hidden glory of its diverse and interesting culinary traditions. In India, two friends, Ankit Gupta and Chirag Chhajer, are responsible for starting the Burmese food revolution. The duo who started out with the restaurant Burma Burma in Mumbai three years ago, followed by a lucrative franchise in Gurugram – the only dedicated Burmese eatery in Delhi NCR other than Burmese Kitchen which takes orders for home delivery – has got an overwhelming response over the years, even though they serve only vegetarian fare. Now, Burmese cuisine has a lot of seafood influence, especially in the coastal towns of Mawlamyine, Thandwe, Ngwesaung and in the villages of Inle Lake but the decision to serve veg food is purely from a business perspective.

Burmese cuisineBurmese cuisine is richer than authentic Chinese food but less spicy than Indian and Thai cuisines.

How did he come across this idea? Gupta decided to tap into the Indian market as he knew that the food is easily adaptable since it has a lot of similarities to Indian food. Also, his life has had a major Burmese influence as his mom is Burmese. She had come to Mumbai in the early 1960s, when regional insurgencies escalated in the country. To cut the long story short, it was to escape the military junta’s tyranny and their unendurable attitude towards pro-democracy movements.

So, what exactly do they have to offer? There are dishes from the state of Kachin like the Kachin Style Dried Mustard Soup which instantly wakes you up owing to its umami flavour, Khowsuey from the Shan State and other delicacies which trace its roots back to Bagan, Chin, Rakhine, Yangon, and Inle Lake. There is also the hot favourite Mohinga, a dish made of rice noodles in a rich broth of onions, garlic, ginger, and lemongrass, topped with deep-fried fritters of banana stem. Considered by many as a national dish, it is eaten at breakfast in Myanmar, or any other time during the day, really. We tried it out at Burma Burma and loved it. If you ask us, it can easily pass off as a breakfast of the champions as it’s really wholesome.

While we were enjoying sour and savoury dishes with the rest of the world trying to catch up with Burmese cuisine, we asked head chef Ansab Khan if the food is authentic or has it been modified to suit the Indian palate, to which he said, “80-90 per cent of the menu is very close to what you get in Burma; the core ingredients of the dishes are something we source from there.”

Burmese Food, MohingaConsidered by many as a national dish, Mohinga is eaten at breakfast in Myanmar, or any other time during the day.

Gupta’s mother and her relatives who trained the staff since its inception keep a check on the flavours every couple of months. The team at Burma Burma also does regular checks to make sure the authenticity of flavours is maintained, even if it means going back to Myanmar and training there with the locals. We still had our doubts so we approached a few customers who revealed that they visit the restaurant often and it’s pretty close to what food tastes like back in Myanmar.

One of them who goes by the name of Shreekant Amdoskar said, “I had Burmese food while I was travelling with my wife within the country in 2015. Since both of us are big time foodies, we tried almost everything that was edible. From restaurants to street food, we had an amazing time exploring the local cuisines. Mohinga is my all-time favourite. It’s good to see what Burma Burma is offering to its customers here in India has an incredible touch of authenticity to it, even though they try new things from time to time. The curated menu for the Thingyan Festival which took place in May this year had some new elements at play like Laphet Hatmin Kyaw (Fried Rice with Pickled Tea Leaf) but it still had a strong Burmese touch to it.”

For their menu, both à la carte and special ones, the owners and chef take inspiration from the different regions and even follow street food culture where you find everything from staple Banana Pancakes to Burmese Samosas. Khan says, “Back in Myanmar, the food culture has apparently been changing with modern influences coming in.” But even today, a typical meal consists of a soup, salad, a non-veg main dish, with side dishes of vegetables and a generous helping of boiled rice. Since Myanmar sits on the eastern edge of the Indian Ocean and its north lies wedged between India and China, many dishes carry the flavours and scents of both. At some point, you might even find okra and turmeric of Bengal in a stew. There’s also the popular samosa!

Khowsuey, Burmese foodNo Burmese meal is complete without Khowsuey.

For those who aren’t aware, Burmese cuisine has strong, pungent flavours and uses a lot of fresh ingredients, tropical fruits and peanuts. They are also big on spicy, sour and crunchy thoke (salads) and can prepare one with almost anything under the sun. The Le Thok Son/Rainbow Salad that we had at the restaurant was a delightful mix of four type of noodles – glass noodles, flat rice noodles, wheat noodles and regular noodles – which came beautifully garnished with raw papaya, cucumber, bean sprouts, potato and carrots with a dollop of jasmine rice.

While we were at it, we also decided to go for Khowsuey as a Burmese meal cannot be complete without it. The Dry Khowsuey and Oh No! Khowsuey soon arrived at our table with a generous helping of peanuts sprinkled on top! Let’s remind you that peanuts are an important part of their cuisine and so are tea and rice. While rice is consumed in the form of glutenous rice cakes or noodles, teahouse culture is an integral part of the country. You can usually find tea shops all over the place with just a few stools set up around a street stand. Chinese tea is popular but another one on the list is the black tea served over a layer of sweetened condensed milk, just like the Vietnamese Ca phe sua da. There’s also the bitter and tart pickled tea leaves called lahpet which is used extensively in dishes, starting from salad to rice. It can also be eaten on their own as a snack or at the end of a meal.

We decided to opt for Laphet Hatmin Kyaw/Fried Rice with Pickled Tea Leaf. The first thing which hit us is the strong flavour of the dish – it’s definitely not for the faint-hearted. In this case, the tea leaves added a bitter taste but you can easily get around it by pairing it with an accompaniment. Tofu with Roselle leaf was our first choice owing to its tangy taste. Usually, in Myanmar, people add bamboo shoot to it but the chef decided against it. Nevertheless, it made for an interesting tasting session. We ended our meal with the delicious Coconut Ice Cream and Black Sticky Rice made with mandarin and brown sugar – it was a match made in heaven.

 

Burmese food, burmese cuisineBurmese people are big on spicy, sour and crunchy thoke (salads) and can prepare one with almost anything under the sun.

After all the indulgence, we would say that we are a true fan of veg Burmese cuisine but the one thing we are on the look out for is non-vegetarian food from the country. We would definitely like to try the Htamin Jin – a specialty of the Tibeto-Burman ethnic group Intha which is made of fermented rice and boiled fish coupled with a few other ingredients. After all, Myanmar cuisine is marked by extensive use of fish sauce and ngapi (a paste made from salted, fermented fish or shrimp). If veg food tastes so good, it’s hard to imagine how delectable the cuisine that hinges on mildly hot and tangy flavours would taste coupled with some meat.

Bengal class 12 topper makes it to Jadavpur University’s merit list, except he didn’t apply

West Bengal Class 12 topper Archisman Panigrahi is in a unique predicament, his name tops the Jadavpur University merit list in four subjects without him ever applying to the varsity.

“I never applied to Jadavpur University but I came to know through a friend that my name figured in the top in the merit list for physics, chemistry, geology and mathematics. The marks and birthdate were not mine,” the student said.

West Bengal Class 12 topper Archisman Panigrahi is in a unique predicament, his name tops the Jadavpur University merit list in four subjects without him ever applying to the varsity.

He said he has informed the varsity authorities.

“I have written to the dean highlighting that I had not applied and I can see my name on the top,” he said.

According to varsity vice chancellor Suranjan Das the matter will be taken up with the cyber crime department of the police.

Kerala NEET rank list for MBBS, BDS admissions released, check it here

Commissioner for Entrance Exams (CEE) Kerala has released the Kerala NEET rank list 2017 for MBBS admissions on its official websitecee-kerala.orgas well as the KEAM login portal – cee.kerala.gov.in. Deric Joseph has topped the merit list

The medical admission process is going to begin in the state now that the NEET rank list for 2017 has been released. The online application process for admissions to MBBS, BDS and other medical courses was completed on July 8.

About 51,066 candidates had submitted their NEET UG result for admissions in Kerala.

About 51,066 candidates had submitted their NEET UG result for admissions in Kerala

The top 10 candidates in the list are:

Deric Joseph

Nada Fathima

Maria Biji Varghese

S Hari Krishnan

George Ben Kuruvila

Preeti Elizabeth Joss

Aysha Farheen

Vishnu Damodaran

George Aditya Paul

Faiza Saheer

How to check your Kerala Engineering Architecture and Medical Courses (KEAM) NEET merit list 2017

1. Go to web pages cee-kerala.orgor KEAM login portal – cee.kerala.gov.in.

2. On the page, click on KEAM merit list

3. In the new page click on NEET merit list

4. The names and percentages of candidates will appear

5. Take a printout

NEET 2017: Round 1 All India Quota allotment list released, check it here

The Medical Counseling Committee (MCC) of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare on Friday released the first allotment list for National Eligibility and Entrance Test (NEET) Under Graduate (UG) admissions 2017 under the 15% All India Quota (AIQ).

Candidates can check their results by clicking here. Key in your roll number and submit to view result.

Candidates whose names appear in the first allotment list should report at the allotted Medical/Dental College for admissions between July 16 and July 22 (until 5pm). Candidates should try to take admissions as early as possible and not wait for last day as there are different schedule of holidays/working hours in various medical/dental colleges. In some of the colleges two to three days are required to complete the formalities.

If a candidate fails to join the allotted college within the stipulated time his seat will be cancelled and he will not be eligible for next round of counseling.

How India’s ed-tech sector can grow and the challenges it must overcome

The Indian education system is often the subject of debate over outdated curriculum, rote learning, rising cost, poor quality of teachers and lack of infrastructure. On the positive side, our country boasts of world-class institutes such as the Indian Institutes of Management, Indian Institutes of Technology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences and Jawaharlal Nehru University. We are also one of the largest and oldest education systems in the world.

Formal education in India is still based on a traditional model or brick-and-mortar classes. Students have to attend schools and colleges to complete their education. While this is the commonly accepted mode of formal education across the world, the education fraternity is opening up to online education or e-learning.

 

Everything is going online. And, so is education.

Scope of e-learning
Online education goes beyond the realms of secondary, post-secondary and tertiary education. It also includes courses and modules for competitive exam preparation, professional skill enhancement, and other non-academic subjects.

According to a report by KPMG, the size of India’s e-learning market was $247 million, comprising 1.6 million users in 2016. The market size is likely to grow eight-fold to $1.96 billion and the user base will grow six times to 9.6 million users by 2021. In fact, India’s e-learning market is the second-largest after the US, which is forecasted to exceed $48 billion by 2020.

Drivers of e-learning growth
Online education in India is evolving at a swift pace owing to the following factors:

1. Growth in Internet and smartphone penetration
The number of Internet users is likely to reach 730 million by 2020, almost double from today’s 432 million. India may replace China to have the second-largest number of users after the US.

India is also the world’s third-largest smartphone market with the number of users estimated to reach 369 million by 2018. Also, mobile Internet users will likely cross 300 million by the end of 2017 from 159 million users at present.

The Internet offers huge accessibility to enrol for distance courses for the young demographic (15-40 years). They are the most active consumers of smartphones and the Internet, and it is they who will be looking for online learning modules to fulfil their educational requirements without having to move out of home, office or city, and spending exorbitantly. The Internet also makes diverse courses, degrees and certifications from around the world easily accessible to urban as well as rural, and mentally or physically restrained populations.

2. Cost of online education is low
A 2015 survey by the National Sample Survey Office reveals that there has been a 175% rise in the average annual private expenditure for general education (primary level to post-graduation and above) between 2008 and 2014. During the same period, the annual cost of professional and technical education increased 96%. Parents spend Rs 36,000 on secondary education in government schools for six years, and Rs 3,96,000 in private schools. If the kids are studying in boarding schools, the cost is close to Rs 18 lakh. Graduate and post-graduate degrees in engineering, medicine, science and commerce are very expensive.

Online education providers can reach out to the masses without setting up physical infrastructure or incurring administrative costs such as staff salaries, stationery and books. Hence, the cost savings are passed to the users.

3. Traditional model unable to fulfil demand
The aim of the government is to raise gross enrolment ratio to 30% by 2020. India will have the world’s largest tertiary-age population and second-largest graduate talent pipeline by the end of 2020. However, the existing educational infrastructure is not equipped to meet the additional requirements. E-learning can supplement the conventional model, and bridge the gap to a considerable extent.

4. Digital-friendly government policies
The government has launched several programmes such as ‘Digital India’ and ‘Skill India’ to spread digital literacy, create a knowledge-based society in India, and implement three principles ‘access, equity and quality’ of the education policy.

  •  e-Basta (schools books in digital form)
  •  e-Education (all schools connected with broadband and free WiFi in all schools and develop pilot MOOCs, or Massive Online Open Courses)
  •  Nand Ghars (digital tools as teaching aids)
  •  SWAYAM (MOOCs based on curriculum taught in classrooms from 9th class till post-graduation)
  •  India Skills Online (learning portal for skill training)

In order to establish digital infrastructure, the government has also launched National Optical Fibre Network, which aims to expand broadband connectivity and create a fast network.

5. Demand among working professionals and job-seekers
The Indian job scenario is reeling under the twin pressure of layoffs and job paucity, especially due to automation and slowdown in the global economy. According to a World Bank report, automation threatens 69% of jobs in India. There have been massive layoffs in the IT, BFSI, telecom and manufacturing sectors, and people are being replaced by machine learning and artificial intelligence.

The current unemployment rate is 5%, which is the highest in five years. With around 1 million Indians entering the workforce every month and India’s working age population expected to reach 64% of the total population by 2021, there is a dire need of job creation. However, a report by the United Nations Development Programme warns that India is likely to face job shortages in the next 35 years.

It has been also found that 58% of unemployed graduates and 62% of unemployed post-graduates say that non-availability of jobs matching their skill and education is the primary reason for their unemployment. The existing formal degree courses taught in India do not impart ‘on-the-job’ skills.

Owing to all these factors, both job-seekers and working professionals feel a need to gain, refresh or enhance their skills through career advancement courses. They feel that such courses could increase their chances of landing better jobs, switch jobs, get promotions, negotiate better pay packages and stay industry-relevant. Online career courses are affordable, give hands-on knowledge, can be completed in one-fourth the time than that of an offline course, and offer flexibility in terms of personal schedule. They can be done anywhere, anytime at one’s convenience.

Challenges are many
Online education is definitely has a bright future in India, but the journey is fraught with several challenges.

1. Insufficient digital infrastructure
While the government has been making efforts to create and improve a digital infrastructure across the country, there hasn’t been any noteworthy progress. According to the World Economic Forum, only 15 out of 100 households have access to the Internet, and mobile broadband remains for a privileged few, with only 5.5 subscriptions for every 100 people. Further, currently broadband reaches just about 600 corridors, largely in and around the top 50-100 Indian cities, leaving rural areas with poor connectivity.

2. Poor learning engagement
In traditional classrooms, student-teacher and peer-to-peer engagement are very high. Learners can approach the instructors and fellow students for feedback or discussions, and get their concerns addressed on-the-spot. E-learning is not yet developed to a level to stimulate open-ended or crowd learning, unless the courses are imparted live with the help of an online instructor.

3. Lack of standardisation, credibility and quality
The lack of standardisation of online programmes and their formal acceptability still remain a concern. E-learning players offer multiple courses on the same subjects with different levels of certifications, methodology and assessment parameters. Online courses are designed and imparted by different instructors, who may be given autonomy to design the curriculum. So, the quality of courses may differ across different e-learning platforms. Most online courses do not get academic credits, credibility and recognition in the traditional educational eco-system.

4. Language of the courses
India is a multi-linguistic country, and a majority of the population comes from non-urban areas. The online courses mostly focus on English content. Hence, non-English speaking students struggle with the availability of vernacular content.

5. Low completion rates
Online courses are self-paced learning. There is minimum or negligible motivation due to lack of face-to-face interaction. Hence, the completion rate of online courses is very low.

Future Trends
The e-learning sector in India will witness the following trends in the next few years:

1. Hybrid model
There will be a convergence of the online and offline education models. Online course providers will work actively to provide supplementary education, such as after-school coaching, e-tutorials, internships and live projects. They will also reach out to students at offline touch points like group discussions and labs. There will be virtual classrooms where traditional offline pedagogy will be aided by digital courses on practical knowledge and soft skills.

2. Addition of new and offbeat subjects
Apart from popular subjects like data science, cloud computing, and digital marketing, the e-learning curriculum will offer courses in unexpected subjects such as culinary management, forensic science, cyber law, etc.

3. Gamification
In order to make learning more interesting, competitive and rewarding for academic students and professionals, the digital courses will incorporate features such as badges, discounts and leader boards. Corporates, educational institutions and e-learning platforms will come together to co-develop content.

4. Peer-to-peer learning and profile mapping
E-learning providers will develop a peer-to-peer model to establish collaborative learning between students through notes and idea sharing on a common platform. Technology such as artificial intelligence, big data, data analytics, facial recognition, etc., will be used to offer profile-based customised courses.

5. Investor interest will grow
Over the last three years, there have been several large-ticket deals in the Indian e-learning sector. The Chang Zuckerberg Initiative invested $50 million in Byju’s, Bertelsmann India has put in $8.2 million in Eruditus, and Kaizen Management Advisors and DeVry Inc. have invested $10 million in EduPristine. Not to forget Khan Academy, which has so far received financial support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Google and Netflix founder Reed Hastings. So, the sector will continue to spark more interest among investors and attract funding.

E-learning has a promising future; it could be on its way to becoming the next sunrise industry. However, it is highly unlikely that it will replace traditional learning; rather both models will work in tandem. The trio of content, delivery and access will act as a change-agent in shaping online education.

Sanjay Bansal is founder and managing partner at investment banking firm Aurum Equity Partners LLP.

Kerala NEET rank list for MBBS, BDS admissions released, check it here

Commissioner for Entrance Exams (CEE) Kerala has released the Kerala NEET rank list 2017 for MBBS admissions on its official websitecee-kerala.orgas well as the KEAM login portal – cee.kerala.gov.in. Deric Joseph has topped the merit list

The medical admission process is going to begin in the state now that the NEET rank list for 2017 has been released. The online application process for admissions to MBBS, BDS and other medical courses was completed on July 8.

About 51,066 candidates had submitted their NEET UG result for admissions in Kerala.

About 51,066 candidates had submitted their NEET UG result for admissions in Kerala

The top 10 candidates in the list are:

Deric Joseph

Nada Fathima

Maria Biji Varghese

S Hari Krishnan

George Ben Kuruvila

Preeti Elizabeth Joss

Aysha Farheen

Vishnu Damodaran

George Aditya Paul

Faiza Saheer

How to check your Kerala Engineering Architecture and Medical Courses (KEAM) NEET merit list 2017

1. Go to web pages cee-kerala.orgor KEAM login portal – cee.kerala.gov.in.

2. On the page, click on KEAM merit list

3. In the new page click on NEET merit list

4. The names and percentages of candidates will appear

5. Take a printout

 

Elliptical Workout: 5 Exercises to Try With It

Elliptical workout consists of those exercises that are done on a cross-trainer or an elliptical trainer. Physical activities like running, walking or climbing stairs are done on these machines without harming or putting any pressure on our knee joints. It is great for cardioand total-body workout. It focuses on your hamstrings, calves, glutes, quadriceps, triceps and biceps. As your feet never leave the pedals, they don’t get repeatedly pounded by each footfall. Regular cardio workouts help relieve stress and boost your immune system

. Combining this workout with a healthy diet can do wonders to your body. Elliptical trainers are often misused and not utilized to their optimum potential. They need to be performed under proper guidance and should be done only after a 4-5 minute warm up. Here are a few elliptical workouts to help yourself get into shape.

 

Elliptical Workout: 5 Exercises to Try With It

1. Core Workout

While working on your core, you shouldn’t use your hands to hold the machine as this puts an added pressure on all the muscles to stay balanced which causes the core to tighten and strengthen. The faster you go, the stronger your core gets. Don’t forget to take regular intervals during the workout.

2.  The Ladder

This workout should be done for 60 minutes and its intensity should be gradually increased. While walking on the treadmill, the height of the ramp should be adjusted within every 5 minutes. During the first 5 minutes, the ramp should be low and the resistance should be low. But during the last 5 minutes, the ramp should be high and the resistance should be high. You take a break every 15 minutes of the workout. This works on your lower body and strengthens your calves and thighs.

3.  High Intensity Workout

This workout should be done after a three-minute warm up. In the beginning, set the ramp and the resistance low and gradually increase the resistance. Follow this workout for 27 minutes with intervals every 2 minutes. To increase the intensity of the workout, keep pushing and pulling the arm’s handles. After every third interval, pedal backwards. This will give you an intense full-body workout and will benefit both your upper body and lower body.

4. Lunch Time Calorie Crunch Workout

This total-body workout lasts for 15 minutes and helps you make the most of your time. It burns calories quickly and gets your heart rate up. The ramp and intensity are quickly changed and increased, without wasting any time. It helps tone all your leg muscles as it alternates between pedaling forward and backward. It doesn’t involve any intervals and has immediate results. It is very helpful for those who have tight schedules and don’t have much time.

5. Rear-End Workout

This workout helps tone your backside and also gives you a good cardio workout. It works on your glutes and hamstrings while increasing your heart rate. The exercise lasts for 35 minutes with 8 intervals in the middle which should be taken after 2 minutes. With every interval both the ramp and the resistance should be gradually increased.