SGPC’s medical college: Confusion over turning Punjab govt seats into management quota

With just a day remaining in counselling for MBBS and BDS courses in Punjab, confusion prevails over whether or not the government will allow Sri Guru Ram Das Medical College (SGRDC), Amritsar, to convert all 75 government quota MBBS seats into management quota on account of its being a Sikh minority institute run by the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC).

Eligible candidates will appear for counselling at Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS) on Monday.

The SGRDC has 150 seats: 75 in government quota and 75 in management/minority quota. The fee for minority/management quota is around Rs 40 lakh for the fiveyear course, which is four times the cost of a seat in the general government quota. On July 1, it announced to scrap government quota, and put all seats under management quota.

Officials from the state government discussed the issue at a meeting in Chandigarh on Friday evening, but no decision was announced. Dr Raj Bahadur, vice-chancellor of the BFUHS, had earlier said, “We can’t accept the proposed division of seats until the institute gets the approval of the ministry concerned.” Harjit Singh, director of public instructions (DPI), colleges, didn’t respond to the text messages and calls.

SGRD has 150 seats, with 75 in the government (general) quota and 75 in the management/minority quota.

An education department official told HT on the condition of anonymity, “SGRDC will definitely get the status of a medical university sooner or later, but cannot charge fee as per its will. They (SGRDC) initially sought to charge Rs 62 lakh for MBBS! But the fee has to be as per the Punjab Private Health Sciences Educational Institutions Act, 2006. Though the official decision is yet to come, it may not be allowed to scrap its government quota this session.”

Parents have been seeking clarity. Naveen Sehgal from Bathinda said, “I am not sure if my child can seek a government quota seat in the SGRDC as they are claiming to have converted all the seats to management quota which are really expensive.”

Geeta Sharma, principal of the college, did not take calls.

PRESENT POSITION, AND POSSIBILITIES

If the SGRDC is allowed to scrap the government/general quota, those having no reservation or those who are not in the NRI quota will not get admission at the institute.

Already, 75 seats in the government quota had 12 seats reserved for NRIs. Of the 63 seats left, 25 are reserved for Scheduled Castes, Backward Classes and physically handicapped candidates.

NEET 2017: Domicile rules leave MBBS, BDS aspirants confused, give them limited college choice

Hundreds of candidates successful in the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET) for admissions to medical and dental programmes and colleges across the country, have been spending time, money and energy desperately seeking admission to colleges in various states of the country. Lack of a uniform domicile policy could put an end to their dreams to pursue fulfilling careers in medicine or dentistry.

While some states like Maharashtra and Punjab have barred candidates from other states from participating in counselling for admission to medical colleges (both private and government), Uttar Pradesh and Karnataka have no such restrictions.

The domicile policy puts students from states with few medical colleges at a disadvantage.

“I couldn’t fill the online form to join counselling in Maharashtra as candidates are required to be state domiciles,” complains a student from Delhi.

While some states like Maharashtra, and Punjab have barred candidates from other states from participating in  counselling for admission to medical colleges (both private and government), Uttar Pradesh and Karnataka have no such restrictions.

MBBS aspirants from Delhi have also been left with limited options as the sprawling Capital has only nine government medical colleges out of which only eight admit students through NEET. The All-India Institute of Medical Sciences, Delhi, has a separate entrance examination.

Students from many north-eastern states such as Arunachal Pradesh, Mizoram, Nagaland, Lakshadweep etc, which don’t have any medical colleges, say that if all states mandate domicile status, they will never be able to pursue MBBS education despite qualifying NEET.

“It’s fortunate that some states are not following domicile restrictions. If this happens then we will be left with only one option – 15% seat reserved under all-India quota in government colleges across the country. This, however, will benefit only the high-rank holders,” says a student who ranks below 20,000 in NEET 2017.

A Supreme Court order of June 7, 2012, states that the Directorate General of Health Services, ministry of health and family welfare, has to conduct online counseling for 15% seats under all-India quota for undergraduate MBBS and BDS programme.

Andhra Pradesh, Telangana and Jammu & Kashmir have opted out of NEET.

In favour of domicile restrictions Dr Raj Bahadur, vice chancellor of Baba Farid University of Health Science, which conducts counselling for MBBS admission in Punjab, says “Every state has the right to protect the interests of its students.” Candidates clearing Class 12 from Punjab can apply for MBBS and BDS programmes in the state.

Many experts disagree.

“A state can impose domicile restriction for admission in government-run colleges but I don’t think the same applies for the private colleges,” says Gulshan Garg, chairman, Sankalp Charitable Trust. It was Sankalp’s petition last year which led to the Supreme Court ordering the implementation of NEET as a single examination for admission to MBBS and BDS programmes in the country.

“What’s the point of a one-nation-one-examination when each state frames its own admission guidelines?” he asks.

Students also complain that the criteria to define domicile varies from one state to another. Some states want Class 12 certificates while others ask from other documents such as birth certificate etc.

NEET rules say that candidates wishing to apply for admission in state medical colleges or universities or institutes using merit list of NEET-2017 have to follow the instructions of the state government or that of the authorities of the medical and dental colleges of the concerned institution or university concerned for counselling. States can reserve 85% seats for their students and leave the 15% quota for students from across the country ranking high on the NEET merit list.

The order of the Tamil Nadu government reserving 85% of its MBBS and BDS seats for state board students was quashed today by the Madras High Court.

 

 

Medical college quota: Decision on management seats at Punjab institute deferred

The state government has deferred a decision on whether it will allow Sri Guru Ram Das Medical College (SGRDC), Amritsar, to convert all 75 government-quota MBBS seats into management quota. Punjab’s director public instructions (DPI) Colleges Harjit Singh chaired the six-hour meeting at his office in Sector 17, Chandigarh. At the meeting, representatives from the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC)-run institute presented detailed rules and regulations that it will follow if given the status of a medical university, a mandatory requirement before the quota of seats can be changed.

SGRD has 150 seats, with 75 in the government (general) quota and 75 in the management/minority quota. The fee for minority/management quota is around Rs 40 lakh. This is about four times the cost (around Rs 10 lakh) of a seat in the government quota. If it is given

SGRD has 150 seats, with 75 in the government (general) quota and 75 in the management/minority quota.

Counselling for registered candidates for medical admissions is scheduled for July 17. In case, no decision is taken on the matter, then students will fill their preference of college according to the current division of seats in the institute.

“The rules that govern the setting up of medical university needed to be studied carefully. There was not enough time to take an immediate decision and approve the relevant rules. One approved, the rules cannot be changed for five years,” said a senior official from Punjab education department. The next date for a meeting has not been decided yet.

THE PRESENT QUOTA POSITION

If the SGRD is allowed to scrap the government (general) quota), those having no reservation or those who are not in the NRI quota will not get admission at the institute. Already, 75 seats in the government quota had 12 seats reserved for NRIs. Of 63 seats left, 25 are reserved for Scheduled Castes, Backward Classes and Handicapped. So, a general category student was fighting for only 38 of 150 seats at the institute. These seats will also go, if the government quota is scrapped.

The management quota also has 11 seats reserved for NRIs.

On July 1, the institute had moved the BFUHS, asking for its nod. This was even as it announced the conversion of its government quota MBBS seats into management quota. The university had denied the nod claiming that the government will take the final call.

 

MBBS admissions: Decision today to convert govt quota seats to management in Punjab college

The state government will take a call on whether it will allow Sri Guru Ram Das Medical College (SGRD), Amritsar, to convert all 75 government-quota MBBS seats into management quota on Tuesday. The Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC)-run institute has 150 seats, with 75 in the government (general) quota and 75 in the management/minority quota. The fee for minority/management quota is around Rs 40 lakh. This is about four times the cost (around Rs 10 lakh) of a seat in the government quota.

On Tuesday, additional chief secretary, higher education, SK Sandhu, will hold a meeting on the issue with officials from Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS), Faridkot, the nodal agency for NEET counselling, and the SGRD.

Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee

Tuesday is also the last day for candidates to register themselves online for admission in medical and dental courses. Counselling is scheduled for July 17. Till now, 8,000 applications have been received.

“The decision needs to be taken as early as possible so that students are clear on the status of the seats in the SGRD,” a senior BFUHS official said.

If the SGRD is allowed to scrap the government (general) quota), those having no reservation or those who are not in the NRI quota will not get admission at the institute. Already, 75 seats in the government quota had 12 seats reserved for NRIs. Of the 63 seats left, 25 are reserved for Scheduled Castes, Backward Classes and Handicapped. So, a general category student was fighting for only 38 of 150 seats at the institute. These seats will also go, if the government quota is scrapped.

The management quota also has 12 seats reserved for NRIs.

BFUHS HAD DENIED NOD

BFUHS has maintained that the SGRD is yet to get status of a medical university and thus seats in government quota can’t be scrapped. On July 1, the institute had moved the BFUHS, asking for its nod. This was even as it announced the conversion of its government quota MBBS seats into management quota.

“If the SGRD is allowed to scrap seats, those candidates who could have been admitted under the government quota on merit will be deprived of the same. A lower-ranked candidate will get in as he can afford the higher fee,” a BFUHS official.

Mumbai student scores 99.6%, but error in online form will cost her a seat in college of her choice

Despite scoring 99.6% in the SSC exams, a Kandivli student will not get admission to the first year junior college (FYJC) of her choice. Why? She listed only one college in her option form, as she was unaware of how to go about the process.

She listed Thakur College, Kandivli, but wants admission to NM College, Vile Parle — an institute she might have gotten into owing to her high score.

Mumbai city news

Her mistake means she will now be allotted Thakur College in the first merit list.

According to admission rules, it is mandatory for students to accept if they are allotted their first preference.

“Having scored 99.6%, the girl could have easily secured admission to any college, but she made a mistake in her application form, which cannot be corrected now,” said a senior education officer, addressing admission-related grievances.

The department has advised the student to reapply for admission through management quota.

KVs thieve thunder: 105 students hit bullseye

Bhopal: All of a hundred and five students from 5 Kendriya Vidyalayas across Bhopal scored 10 CGPA in class X, the consequences for which have been declared with the aid of CBSE on Saturday. In Bhopal place, which has 41 colleges, 99.89% college students were declared bypass. this is zero.04% better than closing yr.

among 5 Kendriya Vidyalayas, KV-1 (Maida mill) gave the quality performance. In all, forty two college students from this college scored 10 CGPA. “college students have now end up sensitive approximately their performances as there may be a fight for each mark. i’m happy to look college students from our college have given pleasant performance among all KVs in Bhopal,” stated Saurabh Jaitley, important, KV-1.

He stated, “college students, who have not achieved 10 CGPA must now not experience horrific. it’s miles just an exam and they must strive for better performance.” In KV-1, 228 students appeared for sophistication 10 examination this yr. last year, of 286 students who had regarded, 29 had scored 10 CGPA.

KV-2, Shivaji Nagar stood second in terms of quantity of college students reaching 10 CGPA. From this faculty, 23 of 177 college students scored 10 CGPA.

In KV-3, Baghsewania, 22 students from the school scored 10 CGPA. main SS Dakua said: “we have attempted to encourage students to do their high-quality. We do no longer pressure students at any degree. I suppose thanks to this, an excellent quantity of students scored 10 CGPA.” 141 college students seemed for the examination.

In KV-4, Bairagarh, 12 college students scored 10 CGPA. In all, 147 college students seemed from this college. This 12 months, another KV opened within the country capital. faculty is situated at Bangrasiya, Bhojpur street. Of 34 students, who appeared from this faculty, 6 scored 10 CGPA.

Assistant commissioner, Kendriya Vidyalaya, Bhopal vicinity B Kaur stated three,499 students seemed from KV, Bhopal place this 12 months. “In all, three,495 college students were declared skip.”

Study ill-effects of crackers in college

UGC secretary Jaspal S Sandhu says the UGC wants varsities and affiliated colleges to organize forums, discussions and presentations related to the hazards of firecrackers.

Students of around 400 universities will study the ill-effects of fireworks. The UGC has instructed all universities and colleges to include a module on the ill-effects of firecrackers in the paper on environmental studies, a compulsory subject for all undergraduate students.

UGC secretary Jaspal S Sandhu says the UGC wants varsities and affiliated colleges to organize forums, discussions and presentations related to the hazards of firecrackers. “The UGC took this decision after it observed the effort of world leaders at COP21 in Paris recently, and underscored the preservation of the environment as our collective responsibility.”

 The December 11 UGC circular said: “We know that the smoke from fireworks consists mainly of particulate matter than can enter the lungs and severely affect people with asthma or multiple chemical sensitivity. Fireworks also spray a toxic concoction of carcinogenic and hormone-disrupting substances that seep into the soil and water…. Worse are chemicals in fireworks that persist in the environment and do not break down.”
 The UGC, referring to earlier studies, said on festive occasions, the levels of particulate matter in the air increases beyond permissible levels. “It is necessary to educate students about the severity of toxicity of fireworks, so also to discourage their usage,” the UGC secretary said.

Modern apprenticeships have grown up

Announce you’ve decided to do an apprenticeship and many will assume you either failed to get into university or you want to be a tradesman. “A lot of parents and teachers don’t understand that pretty much everything from law to web developing can be accessed through a modern apprenticeship,” says Nick Boles, minister of state for skills and equalities.

The landscape has moved on, he says: “You can get a degree through an apprenticeship, so it’s not about capping your ambition. It’s a choice to secure the qualification through working and studying rather than full-time study.”

Boles knows that apprenticeships have a bit of an image problem and is keen to address it: “We just need to get the message out that these are very high-quality programmes.”

June Durrant, deputy principal at Kirklees College in Huddersfield, agrees: “The hard thing is getting people to understand that modern apprenticeships aren’t an ‘oily rag’ route – that’s not the real picture any more.”

This is certainly the case for former Kirklees student Luke Warby, 19, who is now employed by IT firm ProVu after completing a level 3 apprenticeship in professional competence in IT for telecoms professionals combined with a level 3 in IT systems and principles.

“I found out about the apprenticeship from my progress coach at the college,” he says. “As well as the more technical aspects of the job, I’ve learned how to deal with customers with different levels of understanding, so I’ve become more confident when it comes to things like dealing with people on the telephone. I was even awarded an apprentice of the year award last year, so it’s been a really good experience all round.”

Warby’s boss, ProVu managing director Darren Garland, says that taking on apprentices has given his small business – he has just 20 employees – a cost-effective way to get staff up to speed. “We have to train for 6-8 months before we see a return, so we look for potential – that can be a graduate or an apprentice. We weren’t sure how well it would work at first, but taking on Luke and another apprentice, Matt, was such an absolute success we took on a third.”

For many apprentices, the experience of being able to learn on the job provides them with a valuable insight into their chosen career and helps them to make decisions sooner. Rupinder Kooner, 18, from Wolverhampton, is in her third year of a building services in the built environment apprenticeship with WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff. It’s an area she might not have chosen had she decided to go to university first.

“I can transfer to something like civil engineering or railways, but I’m enjoying my current role so much I’m hoping to progress through an HNC and HND, and then I’ll only need to study for a year to top up to a degree. I’ll probably do that part-time while working at WSP – so I’ll get my qualification without all the student debt, as well as getting lots of experience in the workplace.”

Kooner agrees with Boles that the perception of apprenticeships needs to change. “I came out of school with 12 GCSEs, but when I said I wanted to do an apprenticeship, people assumed I wasn’t doing well in school, which wasn’t true.”

But Mel Clark, senior recruitment specialist at WSP Parsons Brinckerhoff says businesses have a more generous view: “For us, apprenticeships are a valid alternative to university. They are much more aligned to what we do as a business and go a long way to addressing the skills shortage in our industry.”

Six questions to ask before choosing your A-levels

Picking your A-level subjects is one of the first big academic decisions that students face. Choosing what to study won’t just determine what you’re doing in year 12 and 13, it could also affect your university choices and even your future career. And it’s not just a case of picking between subject areas – you’ll need to decide what type of qualifications you want to sit and whether it’s best for you to do them at school or a college.

So, what options are available to year 11 students? And how can you weigh up which subjects best suit your ambitions? We spoke to university admissions tutors to find out.

1. Should I take a BTec or A-levels?

If you are studying in England, there are two main types of exams you can sit – BTecs or A-levels, says Jamie Bradford, school and college liaison manager at De Montfort University. “A-levels are exam-focused, and the benefit is that you pick three or four different subjects in your first year, so you don’t need to commit to studying just one area.” These are well established, have an academic focus and are recognised by all universities across the country, he adds.

BTecs, on the other hand, tend to be more vocational and coursework-focused. They’re an increasingly popular option for students who want to go to university – last year, one in four people starting a degree course had one. They tend to be in subjects such as business, media or performing arts and normally students take just one, which is equivalent to three A-levels.

“It’s increasingly common for students to take a mix of A-levels and BTecs – so it’s worth finding out what your local college or sixth form offers,” says Philip Bloor, admissions manager at Sheffield Hallam University. If there’s a particular university course that you’re keen on applying to, he advises checking that BTecs are accepted by its admissions tutors. “In some cases the BTec might be better preparation for university, depending on the study style. They’re acceptable for lots of courses, but not all.”

2. Are AS exams important?

Students taking A-levels next year may want to find out whether local sixth forms will be offering AS qualifications. In the past, AS-level exams, which are sat at the end of year 12, made up half of the final A-level grade. However in many subjects (full list here), this is no longer the case. Despite this, many sixth forms are still entering students to AS exams, even in subjects where this won’t count towards the A-level mark. Doing so means that if a student wants to drop a subject after year 12, they’ll still have a qualification to show for their work.

At Abbeywood school in Bristol, students are being entered for AS exams so that teachers are able to get a sense of whether they’re on track: “It gives us predictions for university admissions and can be useful at a time when the A-level reforms are up in the air,” says Gemma Shafto, head of post-16 at the school.

3. Picking subjects: which ones do universities prefer?

Among the Russell Group universities, which are rated best for research, some subjects are favoured more than others. Each year it publishes an updated guide called Informed Choices, which explains what they are looking for. For example, many admissions tutors won’t accept critical thinking or general studies as one of your three A-level grades.

Students are also encouraged to study some facilitating subjects, which include: maths, English literature, physics, biology, chemistry, geography, history and languages.

The number of facilitating subjects required will vary according to degree programme, explains Mike Nicholson, head of admissions at Bath University. Some, such as medicine, could require three (chemistry, biology and either maths or physics). However, in most cases, there’s no harm in doing one subject that falls outside this list, even if you are keen to go to a Russell Group university.

“For instance, if a student is going to do a degree where they’ll be doing lots of presentations, it might be useful to study drama,” he says. “With something like a law degree, drama may not be an obvious choice. But if you’re thinking about going into the legal profession, where you might need to perform in court, it might actually be useful.”

Russell Group universities also value the extended project, which is a standalone qualification, equal to an AS-level, that shows independent research skills. Some will include this in their offer requirements.

4. Do I need to study maths?

Maths recently overtook English to become the most popular A-level subject. There’s good reason for this: it’s valued by admissions tutors and can help students to keep their options open, says Bloor. “It can allow you to apply to courses in the sciences, maths or computer science,” he says, but adds: “If you already know now that you want to study English, then there’s no need to study maths – you may be better off doing English language, English literature and history.”

Lots of courses will, however, ask for GCSEs in maths, science and English. “This means some students will have to resit, which can be a problem if they don’t find out until it’s too late. For example, for primary teaching courses you need to have a GCSE in a science subject, irrespective of your A-level grades,” says Bloor.

5. Should I pick something I’ve never studied before?

Picking subjects can feel high stakes, but Nicholson adds that – as long as you’ve done your research – there’s no reason to be put off trying something new. “There might be a subject, like politics or the social sciences, that you haven’t studied at GCSE but that would be perfect,” he says.

Speak to your teachers and former students, read up on university requirements and try subjects out, says Scott Peasey, head of the school of A-levels and GCSEs at Kingston College. “A lot of universities will run taster days for year 11s to give them a sense of what a subject is like at university level – they’re keen to do residential events, especially with state schools.”

6. Should I listen to my parents?

University requirements aside, you need to ensure that the subjects you pick are ones that you enjoy. This means thinking about what you – rather than your parents – believe is the best option. “A problem we often have is parents become obsessed with their dream, rather than their son or daughter’s reality. They might think ‘I want to go to Oxford’ – that’s a great dream to have, but if your son or daughter doesn’t want to go to Oxford, then it’s not going to end well.” Shafto says. “Two years is a long time to do a subject, so it’s important that you have the drive and passion to succeed.”

College, varsity students to take 'Swacch Bharat' pledge by February 29

Students of colleges and universities across the country will take the pledge to spread the message of ‘Swacch Bharat’ by February 29 as the government aims to make them “ambassadors of social change”.

In a letter to all Vice-Chancellors, UGC has said the Swachh Bharat Mission has entered a very “crucial phase” and requires concerted efforts by all stakeholders to achieve its objectives.

“In this endeavour, the entire student fraternity of India can become our ambassadors of social change,” the letter by UGC secretary Jaspal S Sandhu said.

“You are, therefore, requested to kindly conduct mass pledges of students within 29th February, 2016 in your university and affiliated colleges and also encourage the students to take up cleanliness activities to honour their pledges,” the letter added.

As per the pledge, students will express commitment to remaining clean and give two hours every week to voluntary work for cleanliness.

They will also take a pledge to propagate the message of Swachh Bharat Mission in cities, villages and towns and also pledge to encourage 100 other persons to take the same vow.