Tall, obese men at increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer

Men who are tall and obese may be at an increased risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer as well as death from the condition, according to a study. The findings showed that with every additional ten centimetres (3.9 inches) of height the risk of aggressive prostate cancer and death from it increased by 21 per cent and 17 per cent, respectively. Higher BMI was also found to be associated with increased risk of aggressive tumours as well as increased risk of death from prostate cancer. This may be due to…

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Eating tomatoes every day may reduce risk of skin cancer, finds study

If you love eating tomatoes, then here’s another reason to keep up the good habit. A recent study has found that eating tomatoes daily brings down the risk of skin cancer, especially in men, by half. Through a study conducted on mice, researchers explained how nutritional interventions can alter the risk for skin cancers. Male mice were fed a diet consisting of 10% tomato powder daily for 35 weeks, then exposed to ultraviolet light. They experienced, on average, a 50% decrease in skin cancer tumours compared to mice that ate…

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Attention, men. Being tall and obese puts you at a higher risk of prostate cancer

Men who are tall and obese are at an increased risk of high grade prostate cancer and prostate cancer death, according to a recent study. The team led by the University of Oxford, UK found that while height was not associated with overall prostate cancer risk, risk of high grade disease and death from prostate cancer increased by 21% and 17% respectively with every additional ten centimetres (3.9 inches) of height. Higher BMI was also found to be associated with increased risk of high grade tumours, as well as increased risk of…

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Men may not need immediate surgery after being detected with prostate cancer

It’s a common belief that cancer needs to be treated as soon as possible. But that’s not necessarily the case with prostate tumour. Men increasingly have choices if their cancer is found at an early stage, as most cases in the US are. They can treat it right away or monitor with periodic tests and treat later if it worsens or causes symptoms. Now, long-term results are in from one of the few studies comparing these options in men with tumours confined to the prostate. After 20 years, death rates were roughly…

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New way of predicting kidney function may improve cancer therapy

A team of researchers has come up with a new statistical model that estimates kidney function in patients with cancer. According to the University of Cambridge researchers, this is the most accurate model for estimating kidney function yet developed and should help cancer specialists treat their patients more safely and improve the accuracy of chemotherapy dosing. Kidneys perform a number of vital functions, including filtering waste and toxins out of the blood, producing vitamin D, and regulating blood pressure. The filtration function of the kidneys is measured by the glomerular…

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Yoga Can Reverse DNA Changes, Reducing Risk of Cancer and Depression: Study

Yoga has long being touted as the one-stop solution to a healthy body, mind and soul. This ancient form of physical exercise works on different parts of the body to boost its overall function and well-being. Now a new study done by researchers from Universities of Coventry and Radboud states that yoga can also affect molecular reactions in the DNA and prevent risks of certain ailments. Mind-body interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga and Tai Chi can help reduce risk of depression and cancer by reversing the molecular reactions in DNA if practiced on a…

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Yet Another Benefit of the Mediterranean Diet: It May Cut Cancer Risk by 86%

Consuming a Mediterranean diet – rich in fruits and fish – while decreasing the intake of soft drinks may help prevent the risk of developing colorectal cancer by nearly 86 per cent, suggests a new study. Colorectal cancer develops from intestinal polyps and has been linked to a low-fibre diet heavy on red meat, alcohol and high-calorie foods.   “We found that each one of these three choices was associated with a little more than 30 per cent reduced odds of a person having an advanced, pre-cancerous colorectal lesion, compared to people…

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Cancer Survivors May Be Less Likely to Get Pregnant, Reveals Study

A new study, presented at the Annual Meeting of European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) in Geneva, indicates that women who have survived cancer may be less likely to conceive. The negative effect has been attributed to the treatment methods used for cancer such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Researchers believe that these can affect fertility and may also cause damage to the ovaries, uterus and potentially affect those brain centres that control the reproductive axis. According to Richard Anderson, Professor at the University of Edinburgh, “This analysis provides evidence of the…

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