These tattoos changes colour depending on blood-sugar level and could be the next big boon for diabetics

Love getting inked? With time we have come across various tattoo trends, from minimalist tattoos to elaborate colourful tattoos, that says a story of their own. But do you think it’s just a fashion statement? While there may have been few bizarre and unusual tattoo trends in the last couple of years, from people donning eyeball tattoos to freckles. There are many who have used tattoos for a good cause. scare-hiding tattoos have been there for quite some time now, that helps patients with big surgical scars and acid attack victims to beautify their marks, now there is a colour-changing tattoo. Yes, and it’s not about style, this has been designed for patients with diabetes.

Scare-hiding tattoos have been there for quite some time now, that helps patients with big surgical scars and acid attack victims to beautify their marks, now there is a colour-changing tattoo. Yes, and it’s not about style, this has been designed for patients with diabetes.

A group of researchers from Harvard and MIT have recently created tattoos that change colour based on the rise and fall in the blood sugar levels. The colour-changing ink used in these ‘biosensing tattoos’ turns the body’s surface into an ‘interactive display’ to alert diabetics when their blood sugar level is too low or high. “It blends advances in biotechnology with traditional methods in tattoo artistry,” the team writes on their blog.

If blood sugar level is low it changes from brown to blue, and if it is high then it changes from blue to brown.

These helpful medicinal tattoos are a result of the Dermal Abyss project. “Traditional tattoo inks are replaced with biosensors whose colours change in response to variations in the interstitial fluid. It blends advances in biotechnology with traditional methods in tattoo artistry,” says their blog-post on the project that is still at the research level.

The salt-sensing inks track the mineral by measuring sodium levels. “The pH sensor changes between purple and pink, the glucose sensor shifts between blue and brown; the sodium and a second pH sensor fluoresce at a higher intensity under UV light,” the blog added.

 

The research could be quite revolutionary for people living with Type 1 and 2 Diabetes. As severe patients now need to pierce their skin, 3 to 10 times, these tattoos can ut an end to their pain. “With Dermal Abyss, we imagine the future where the painful procedure is replaced with a tattoo, of which the colour from pink to purple based on the glucose levels. Thus, the user could monitor the colour changes and the need for insulin.”

Getting a tattoo has been more than a fashion statement for centuries. While many tribes used it as a symbol of the clan, ancient practices also suggest it’s used as a punishment and there is some evidence of medicinal tattoos in ancient Egypt.

Indian cuisine needs to be revived: Chef Ajay Chopra

Chef Ajay Chopra, who has explored forgotten recipes and delicacies from different northern states of India for a new season of food show “Northern Flavours”, feels Indians have started valuing international cuisine over their own. He says it’s imperative to revive the love for Indian food. “When ‘Northern Flavours’ was conceived, the makers of the show came to me with the idea and I was completely thrilled. It happened exactly when chef Manjit Singh (alumni chef) and I were talking about the downfall of the Indian cuisine, particularly in India and how it needs to be revived.

“People in India have started to explore much more foreign food than our own food. That’s where this whole thought process came and I was very kicked about the show, and said, ‘Let’s do it’,” Chopra told IANS.

With “Northern Flavours”, which went on air earlier this week on Living Foodz channel, the attempt is “to glorify Indian food”.

“It was to gets it glory a hundred years back but somehow it never happened. I am just being a torchbearer of our own cuisine, which is so great and full of flavour. It just didn’t get the right platform,” Chopra added.

For the show, the team explored foodie delights like Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Bihar, Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, Jammu and Kashmir, Jharkhand, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand and Delhi. Chopra describes it as a learning experience wherein he discovered new recipes and techniques.

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“In the last 21 years of my career, every day has been a learning one. But during the show, I came across Rawat’s kachoris (from Jaipur). There were spots on the kachoris and ideally, a chef would discard it. I got to know that he (chef there) would sprinkle cold water on them before frying, and that’s what made them special.

“I never knew it. That’s why every single time I travel or go out, my eyes are always open to see and explore new things that our country has to offer,” said Chopra, who has shows like “Hi Tea” and “Chop Chop Chopra” to his credit.

He even co-hosted and judged MasterChef India’s Season 1 and 2.

As a chef who worked as the head of the kitchen brigade for globally recognized hotel chains Marriott and Starwood, was it difficult for him to showcase recipes which had tough and cumbersome techniques behind them?

“If something is cooked on coal for two days, we are not going to replicate that on television, but at the same time we get the essence of it. We try to understand what exactly happens. If a recipe requires slow cooking, we will take that essence… We might not cook it on smoke, but we will cook it for six hours. We do the research and then show it on TV as people need to replicate the same things at home.” Chopra said.

Going forward, the chef said he wants to keep exploring Indian food and also try to bring “Northern Flavours 3”.

 

PU CET UG result 2017 date and time: Results to be out at puchd.ac.in

PU CET UG result 2017: Panjab University is likely to release the merit list for admission in the undergraduate Common Entrance Test (CET) 2017 today at puchd.ac.in. Students who have appeared for this exam can check their results from the official website of the university (see steps below to know how).

The option filling too will start from July 14. The entrance exam was held on June 4. The provisional list will be released after July 18 while the candidates have to report to the alloted colleges on July 19 to 21. The classes will begin from July 24.

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PU CET UG result 2017: Here’s how to check results

Step 1: Go to the official website of Panjab University (puchd.ac.in)
Step 2: Go to the admissions page.
Step 3: Click on the link for “PU-CET (P.G.) Entrance Test- 2017” and follow the link provided to the exam portal.
Step 4: Click on the notification that reads “Click Here For Result”.
Step 5: Enter you roll number, select your course and search for your result.
Step 6: Download your result and save a copy for further reference.

The exam is held for admissions into various undergraduate courses such as Bachelor of Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery B.Pharmacy and B.Sc. (Hons.) in the Punjab University.

More medical colleges: Port hospitals to be teaching institutes, says Gadkari

New Delhi The government plans to convert existing hospitals at India’s major ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on PPP basis, Union minister Nitin Gadkari said on Thursday.

“We will convert the existing hospitals at our ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis,” shipping, road transport and highways minister Gadkari told PTI.

He said that a committee appointed by the government, headed by Medical Council of India (MCI) member Ved Prakash Mishra had submitted its report in this regard.

The seats in such medical colleges would depend on capacity, he added.

Road transport and highways minister Nitin Gadkari has said that the government will convert existing hospitals at Indian ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis.

Citing an example, he said that the port hospital at Mumbai Port Trust would be converted into a 1,000-bed medical college while at some places it would be of 600 or 700 seats capacity, depending on the institute.

Gadkari said that a part of the funding would be met through the government while the rest will come from private players.

India has 12 major ports, namely Kandla, Mumbai, JNPT, Mormugao, New Mangalore, Kochi, Chennai, Ennore, V O Chidambaranar, Visakhapatnam, Paradip and Kolkata (including Haldia), which handle approximately 61 % of the country’s total cargo traffic.

Earlier, addressing an event at Assocham, he said the government had increased the length of National Highways from 96,000 km to 1.75 lakh km, upping its capacity to handle about 85%of the country’s total traffic.

He said the government was also focused on promoting alternative fuel to cut down on huge Rs 7 lakh crore import bills.

“We are going to bring in a policy to promote use of alternative fuel which is indigenous and pollution-free as it will help in saving lot of time, bring down logistics cost by 4 to 6%, which is currently about 14 to18% unlike in China where it is 10 to12% and in European countries where it is 12 to 14%,” he said.

 

More medical colleges: Port hospitals to be teaching institutes, says Gadkari

New Delhi The government plans to convert existing hospitals at India’s major ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on PPP basis, Union minister Nitin Gadkari said on Thursday.

“We will convert the existing hospitals at our ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis,” shipping, road transport and highways minister Gadkari told PTI.

He said that a committee appointed by the government, headed by Medical Council of India (MCI) member Ved Prakash Mishra had submitted its report in this regard.

The seats in such medical colleges would depend on capacity, he added.

Citing an example, he said that the port hospital at Mumbai Port Trust would be converted into a 1,000-bed medical college while at some places it would be of 600 or 700 seats capacity, depending on the institute.

Gadkari said that a part of the funding would be met through the government while the rest will come from private players.

India has 12 major ports, namely Kandla, Mumbai, JNPT, Mormugao, New Mangalore, Kochi, Chennai, Ennore, V O Chidambaranar, Visakhapatnam, Paradip and Kolkata (including Haldia), which handle approximately 61 % of the country’s total cargo traffic.

Road transport and highways minister Nitin Gadkari has said that the government will convert existing hospitals at Indian ports into medical colleges and super speciality centres on a PPP basis.

Earlier, addressing an event at Assocham, he said the government had increased the length of National Highways from 96,000 km to 1.75 lakh km, upping its capacity to handle about 85%of the country’s total traffic.

He said the government was also focused on promoting alternative fuel to cut down on huge Rs 7 lakh crore import bills.

“We are going to bring in a policy to promote use of alternative fuel which is indigenous and pollution-free as it will help in saving lot of time, bring down logistics cost by 4 to 6%, which is currently about 14 to18% unlike in China where it is 10 to12% and in European countries where it is 12 to 14%,” he said.

 

10 Really Scary Ingredients That Might Be in Your Vitamins

A lot of people take vitamins, and there’s been a lot of news hitting the waves recently that have some people wondering, “What the heck is in these things?”

Katerina Schneider, founder/CEO of Ritual, a soon-to-launch “vitamin revolution” is pretty much on a mission to change that (the site is taking reservations now and is planning to launch later this fall). Her light-bulb idea: Create a vitamin that eliminates all the unnecessary ingredients and provides only what we need, while giving consumers all the research on what kind of vitamin does what. In a nutshell, be clean and transparent.

“There are weird ingredients in some vitamins that you probably wouldn’t ingest in your food or even put ON your body,” Schneider says. Even scarier? She says one in two Americans takes a vitamin/supplement daily and yet 90 percent of vitamins contain one or more of the following ingredients:

Petroleum byproducts (source for most vitamins)

Coal tar derivatives (intermediates in vitamin production)

Polyethylene glycol (industrial antifreeze)

Titanium dioxide (indigestible colorant)

Mineral oil (causes vitamin deficiencies)

Carrageenan (gastrointestinal inflammation)

Parabens (hormone disruptors)

Ion-exchange resins (plastics)

Gelatin (cow skin and bones)

Artificial colorants (carcinogens)

So what is someone to do who is still keen to take vitamins yet wants to stay away from all this less-than-appealing list? Schneider says a good start is to look for vegan-friendly, allergen-free and non-GMO where applicable. “Know your source and learn which forms to look for. Many vitamin brands use the cheapest possible form of each nutrient that doesn’t do a lot of good in the body, and could actually beharmful.”

Diabetes patients, take note: You may be at greater risk of tooth loss

Good dental care is extremely important for diabetics. According to a recent study, the disease can even risk a patient’s oral health. The University of Pennsylvania researchers found that the oral microbiome is affected by diabetes, causing a shift to increase its pathogenicity. The research not only showed that the oral microbiome of mice with diabetes shifted but that the change was associated with increased inflammation and bone loss. It is of significance in India where diabetes is on the rise among the population, and alarmingly, a lot of people remain undiagnosed.

“Up until now, there had been no concrete evidence that diabetes affects the oral microbiome,” said senior author Dana Graves. “But the studies that had been done were not rigorous.” Just four years ago, the European Federation of Periodontology and the American Academy of Periodontology issued a report stating there is no compelling evidence that diabetes is directly linked to changes in the oral microbiome. But Graves and colleagues were skeptical and decided to pursue the question, using a mouse model that mimics Type 2 diabetes.

“My argument was that the appropriate studies just hadn’t been done, so I decided, We’ll do the appropriate study,” Graves said. The team began by characterising the oral microbiome of diabetic mice compared to healthy mice. They found that the diabetic mice had a similar oral microbiome to their healthy counterparts when they were sampled prior to developing high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. But, once the diabetic mice were hyperglycemic, their microbiome became distinct from their normal littermates, with a less diverse community of bacteria.

Diabetes patients have increased levels of a molecule that is important in immune response and inflammation. (Shutterstock)

The diabetic mice also had periodontitis, including a loss of bone supporting the teeth, and increased levels of IL-17, a signalling molecule important in immune response and inflammation. Increased levels of IL-17 in humans are associated with periodontal disease. “The diabetic mice behaved similar to humans that had periodontal bone loss and increased IL-17 caused by a genetic disease,” Graves said.

The findings underscored an association between changes in the oral microbiome and periodontitis but didn’t prove that the microbial changes were responsible for disease. To drill in on the connection, the researchers transferred microorganisms from the diabetic mice to normal germ-free mice, animals that have been raised without being exposed to any microbes. These recipient mice also developed bone loss. A micro-CT scan revealed they had 42% less bone than mice that had received a microbial transfer from normal mice. Markers of inflammation also went up in the recipients of the diabetic oral microbiome.

“We were able to induce the rapid bone loss characteristic of the diabetic group into a normal group of animals simply by transferring the oral microbiome,” said Graves. With the microbiome now implicated in causing the periodontitis, Graves and colleagues wanted to know how. Suspecting that inflammatory cytokines, and specifically IL-17, played a role, the researchers repeated the microbiome transfer experiments, this time injecting the diabetic donors with an anti-IL-17 antibody prior to the transfer. Mice that received microbiomes from the treated diabetic mice had much less severe bone loss compared to mice that received a microbiome transfer from untreated mice.

The findings “demonstrate unequivocally” that diabetes-induced changes in the oral microbiome drive inflammatory changes that enhance bone loss in periodontitis, the authors wrote. Though IL-17 treatment was effective at reducing bone loss in the mice, it is unlikely to be a reasonable therapeutic strategy in humans due to its key role in immune protection. But Graves noted that the study highlights the importance for people with diabetes of controlling blood sugar and practicing good oral hygiene. The study is published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

Want to be healthy and live longer? Drink a cup of coffee a day

Drinking coffee is good for you. In fact, it can lead to a longer life, according to a new study reported by US researchers at the University of Southern California (USC). In a study of more than 1,80,000 participants, the researchers found that people who drank regular or decaffeinated coffee experienced health benefits, such as increased longevity. Previous research had shown that coffee can lower the risk of several diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, liver cirrhosis and Parkinson’s and can reduce chemicals in the blood that can trigger heart disease.

The researchers report in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine that people who consumed a cup of coffee a day were 12% less likely to die earlier compared to those who didn’t drink coffee. This association was even stronger for those who drank two to three cups a day — 18% reduced chance of death.

Lower mortality was present regardless of whether people drank regular or decaffeinated coffee, suggesting the association is not tied to caffeine. Drinking coffee was also found to be associated with a lower risk of death due to heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and respiratory and kidney disease. The study participants were followed up on the average for 16 years.

Coffee

Claimed to be the largest of its kind, the study had ethnically diverse participants who included African-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites. “Such investigations are important because lifestyle patterns and disease risks can vary substantially across racial and ethnic backgrounds, and findings in one group may not necessarily apply to others.”

Since the association (between coffee drinking and longer life) was seen in four different ethnicities, it is safe to say the results apply to other groups, the authors claim. “Seeing a similar pattern across four different populations gives stronger biological backing to the argument that coffee is good for you whether you are white, African-American, Latino or Asian.” According to the authors, although this study does not show what chemicals in coffee may have this beneficial effect, it is clear that coffee “can be incorporated into a healthy diet and lifestyle”.

Young Teens Beware- You May Just Be As Inactive As The 60 Year Olds

Kids perhaps its time to put the smart phone down and go for a jog, as according to a recent study, physical activity amongst teens and young adults may be at an all-time low. The alarming findings labelled the 19 year olds to be as sedantry as the 60 year olds.

 

The reduced physical activity levels has already been touted as one of the major contributors in the growing obesity epidemic, particularly among children and teens. At this point, the study conducted by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in the US is definitely a wake-up call.

 

The researchers of the study published in the journal Preventive Medicin, found that young adults after the age of 20 show the only increase in activity over the lifespan, and starting at age 35, activity levels declined through midlife and older adulthood.

 

The study also identified different times throughout the day when activity was highest and lowest, across age groups and between males and females.

obese

Assistant Professor Vadim Zipunnikov and senior author of the study said, “Activity levels at the end of adolescence were alarmingly low, and by age 19, they were comparable to 60- year-olds.”

 

According to the researchers, these patterns could be a strong message to the programmes and campaingns aimed towards increasing physical activity to relook their target, and focus not only age groups but also the time span with the least activity, such as during the morning for children and adolescents.

 

Zipunnikov further said, “For school-age children, the primary window for activity was the afternoon between 2 and 6 pm. So the big question is how do we modify daily schedules, in schools for example, to be more conducive to increasing physical activity?”

 

The researchers used data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the 2003-2004 and 2005-2006 survey cycles.

 

For the study 12,529 participants wore tracking devices for seven straight days, removing them for only bathing and at bedtime. The devices measured how much time participants were sedentary or engaged in light or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

 

According to the findings , the only age group that saw an increase in activity levels, were the 20 somethings, which was spread out throughout the day, with an increase in physical activity in the early morning, compared to younger adolescents, the increase may be related to starting full-time work and other life transitions.

 

It was also found that for all age groups, males were generally found to have higher activity levels than females, particularly high-intensity activity, but after midlife, these levels took a sharp drop as compared to females.Among adults 60 years and older, males were more sedentary and had lower activity levels than females.

 

The study found that more than 25 per cent of boys and 50 per cent of girls aged six to 11 and over 50 per cent of male and 75 per cent of female adolescents aged 12 to 19 had not met the WHO recommendation and guidelines of minimum physical activity levels. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity a day for children aged five to 17 years.

Should You Be Having Milk On An Empty Stomach?

Over the past few years, I have realized that ‘when you eat’ is equally important as ‘what you eat’. Food combinations and timings can influence your health, nutrient absorption and a lot of other things. Diet planning is a meticulous process that should be based on the effectiveness and alertness of various bodily processes which take place throughout the day. These functions need to be supplied with the right kind of nutrition at the right time.

I recently learned that drinking milk just before sleeping may not be as healthy as previously thought. “Milk is a meal in itself and consuming it just before turning in may slow down the digestion process and cause gastric problems for some people. It is like having another meal post dinner,” noted a Delhi-based weight management expert Anshul Jaibharat. Given this fact, should you rather have milk first thing in morning? Most of us, quickly gulp down a glass full of milk or a cold coffee on our way out before eating anything else. But, is it the right thing to do or should you avoid having milk on an empty stomach? We asked experts to help us understand this better.

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Milk, the first meal for many

“Milk is a complete meal in itself. Traditionally, most of us are used to starting our day with a glass of milk. Those who are not lactose-intolerant can have a glass of milk in the morning to ensure a supply of essential nutrients right at the start of the day. I don’t see any problem in consuming milk on an empty stomach unless you suffer from poor digestion, gastric issues or are lactose intolerant,” shared Dr. Rupali Datta, Consultant Nutritionist.

Not an ideal first meal?

“I don’t recommend milk as the first thing you should have to start your day. Lemon water or apple cider vinegar are healthier options to kick start your day. You can then add milk in your cereal or have it in combination with something else. In my opinion, if your stomach is empty, you should always start with something light that has a cleansing effect on your system. Chaach or other fermented versions are much easier to digest,” noted Macrobiotic Nutritionist and Health Practitioner, Shilpa Arora ND,

milk

Ayurveda speaks

“Milk should not ideally be had by everyone on an empty stomach. It depends on what body composition you have. If you are air dominated (Vata) or Kapha dominated (water), never have milk on an empty stomach. Those prone to cough and flu should also not have it the first thing in morning. People with hyper acidic tendency can have cold milk as calcium when mixed with acid turns into salt and relieves acute acidity. Vata composition people can have milk anytime in the day and can benefit a lot by drinking milk with jaggery,” shared Yogacharya Anoop, Chaitanya Foundation, Mediyoga,

All in all, different body types react differently to milk. A person prone to food allergies must be extra cautious. Your daily diet should be tailor-made to suit what your body requires. “Listen to your body, you will know if having a certain ingredient on an empty stomach revs up your energy or leaves you with a squeamish, heavy feeling,” concluded Dr. Datta.